The Life-World is NOT a Laboratory

An interesting article in the New Yorker on a marked increase in the non-replicability of experimental findings. One might wonder how such a phenomenon might throw different light on peer review criteria, especially the notion of broader impacts within the health sciences.

But now all sorts of well-established, multiply confirmed findings have started to look increasingly uncertain. It’s as if our facts were losing their truth: claims that have been enshrined in textbooks are suddenly unprovable. This phenomenon doesn’t yet have an official name, but it’s occurring across a wide range of fields, from psychology to ecology. In the field of medicine, the phenomenon seems extremely widespread, affecting not only antipsychotics but also therapies ranging from cardiac stents to Vitamin E and antidepressants: Davis has a forthcoming analysis demonstrating that the efficacy of antidepressants has gone down as much as threefold in recent decades.

Read more
The Truth Wears Off:
Is there something wrong with the Scientific Method?

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