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CHARACTERIZATION OF LOCALIZED CORROSION OF COPPER PIPES USED IN DRINKING WATER

Contact
ROSALIE ALBONETTI
phone: 5135697098
email: albonetti.rosalie@epa.gov

Description:

Localized corrosion of copper, or "copper pitting" in water distribution tubing is a large problem at many utilities. Pitting can lead to pinhole leaks less than a year. Tubing affected by copper pitting will often fail in ultiple locations, resulting in a frustrating situation for home and business owners. Many homeowners elect to replace their home plumbing system after repairing a few leaks to avoid the hassle of continually repairing damage caused by copper pitting. In addition to the associated expense of repairing drywall or plaster, pinhole leaks also create a favorable environment for the growth of mold. Although it is unlikely that pitting will result in copper levels above the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) action level of 1.3 mg/L, utilities have a responsibility to minimize distribution system corrosion through water treatment.

Purpose/Objective:

INFORMATION

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/POSTER)
Projected Completion Date: 08/07/2008
Record Last Revised: 10/29/2008
Record Created: 10/24/2008
Record Released: 10/24/2008
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 200190

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND SUPPORT DIVISION

Citation:

Davis, D., H. Jones, AND D. Lytle. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOCALIZED CORROSION OF COPPER PIPES USED IN DRINKING WATER. Presented at Fifth Annual EPA Drinking Water Workshop on Treatment and Distribution System Compliance Challenges, Cincinnati, OH, August 05 - 07, 2008.

URLs/Downloads:

 


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