NIH Clinical Research Studies

Protocol Number: 06-AA-0129

Active Followup, Protocols NOT Recruiting New Patients

Title:
NK1 Receptor Antagonism for Treatment of Anxiety and Craving in Anxious Alcohol Dependent Subjects During Early Abstinence
Number:
06-AA-0129
Summary:
This study will determine whether the experimental drug LY686017 can reduce a person's desire for alcohol. A brain chemical called Substance P acts at places in the brain called NK1 receptors. Substance P is released in response to stress and gives rise to behaviors that are thought to represent anxiety. LY686017 blocks Substance P from acting at the NK1 receptors.

People between 21 and 65 years of age who have been drinking on a regular basis for at least one month before entering the study, who meet the criteria for alcohol dependence and who have an elevated score on a general test of anxiety may be eligible for this study.

Participants are admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for 35 days. They participate in an alcohol treatment program in addition to the research study. After having been withdrawn from alcohol for at least 2 days, participants receive either 50 mg of LY686017 or placebo (an inactive substance that looks like the study drug) every morning for 28 days. In addition to drug treatment, they undergo the following procedures:

-Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): In the last week of the study, subjects undergo MRI to study the amount of blood going to brain structures thought to be involved in anxiety and craving. During the procedure, they look at pictures of faces exhibiting various emotions and pictures related to alcohol.

-Cure reactivity: At the beginning and towards the end of the study, subjects are asked to rate their alcohol craving and their anxiety level while they sniff and handle their favorite alcoholic beverage or water.

-Metyrapone test: During weeks 1 and 4 of the study, subjects are given metyrapone - a drug that interferes with the body's ability to make the stress hormone cortisol - to determine how LY686017 affects the body's hormonal response. The drop in cortisol from metyrapone administration causes the brain to release ACTH, a hormone that causes the adrenal gland to make cortisol.

-Trier test: In the last week of the study, subjects give a 5-minute speech to three people and are then asked to subtract numbers in their head. Then they are asked to rate their feelings and desire for alcohol on two rating scales. Blood is drawn from a saline lock at the beginning and end of the test to measure hormone levels.

-Rating scales: Subjects complete an Obsessive Drinking Scale weekly and an Alcohol Urge Questionnaire and Comprehensive Psychiatric Rating Scale twice a week.

-Blood tests: Blood samples are collected periodically to check blood chemistries, clotting time, and the amount of LY686017 in the blood.

Sponsoring Institute:
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Recruitment Detail
Type: Completed Study; data analyses ongoing
Gender: Male & Female
Referral Letter Required: No
Population Exclusion(s): Children

Eligibility Criteria: This study is not currently recruiting new subjects. If you have questions about participating in a study, please contact the Patient Recruitment and Public Liaison Office, CC.
Special Instructions:
Currently Not Provided
Keyword(s):
Anxiety
Alcohol Dependence
Recruitment Keyword(s):
Alcohol Dependence
Alcoholism
Condition(s):
Alcohol Dependence
Alcoholism
Investigational Drug(s):
LY686017
Investigational Device(s):
None
Interventions:
Drug: LY686017
Supporting Site:
Eli Lilly and Company

Contact(s):
This study is not currently recruiting new subjects. If you have questions about participating in a study, please contact the Patient Recruitment and Public Liaison Office, CC.

Citation(s):
Anton RF, Moak DH, Latham PK. The obsessive compulsive drinking scale: A new method of assessing outcome in alcoholism treatment studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1996 Mar;53(3):225-31

Bohn MJ, Krahn DD, Staehler BA. Development and initial validation of a measure of drinking urges in abstinentalcoholics. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1995 Jun;19(3):600-6.

Brownell KD, Marlatt GA, Lichtenstein E, Wilson GT. Understanding and preventing relapse. Am Psychol. 1986 Jul;41(7):765-82.

Active Followup, Protocols NOT Recruiting New Patients

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