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What You Need To Know About™ Multiple Myeloma
    Posted: 03/18/2005




Introduction






What Is Multiple Myeloma?






Risk Factors






Symptoms






Diagnosis






Staging






Treatment






Side Effects of Treatment






Supportive Care






Complementary and Alternative Medicine






Nutrition






Follow-up Care






Sources of Support






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Introduction

This National Cancer Institute (NCI) booklet (NIH Publication No. 04-1575) has important information about multiple myeloma*, cancer that starts in certain white blood cells (plasma cells). You will read about possible causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. You also will find ideas about how to cope with the disease.

Each year, about 15,000 Americans learn they have multiple myeloma. Scientists are studying this disease to find out more about how it develops. And they are looking at better ways to treat it.

The NCI provides information about cancer, including the publications mentioned in this booklet. You can order these materials by telephone or on the Internet. You can also read them on the Internet and print your own copy.

  • Telephone (1-800-4-CANCER): Information Specialists at NCI's Cancer Information Service can answer your questions about cancer. They also can send NCI booklets, fact sheets, and other materials.
  • Internet (http://www.cancer.gov): You can use NCI's Web site to find a wide range of up-to-date information. For example, you can find many NCI booklets and fact sheets at http://www.cancer.gov/publications. People in the United States and its territories may use this Web site to order printed copies. This Web site also explains how people outside the United States can mail or fax their requests for NCI booklets.

You can ask questions online and get help right away from Information Specialists through LiveHelp. (Click on the "Need Help?" at http://www.cancer.gov. Then click on "Connect to LiveHelp.")


*Words that may be new to readers appear in italics. The "Dictionary" section explains these terms. Some words in the "Dictionary" have a "sounds-like" spelling to show how to pronounce them.

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